The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview

To Julia Dent

Camp At Matamoras Mexico
June 5th 1846

I recieved a few days ago My Dearest Julia your sweet letter of the 12th of May. How often I have wished the same thing you there express, namely that we had been united when I was last in Mo. You dont know how proud and how happy it made me feel to hear you say that willingly you would share my tent, or my prison if I should be taken prisoner. As

yet my Dearest I am unhurt and free, and our troops are occupying a conquered city. After two hard fought battles against a force three or four times as numerous as our own we have chased the enemy from their homes and I have not the least apprehention that they will ever return here to reconquer the place. But no doubt we will follow them up. I believe the General's plan is to march to Monteray, a beautiful little city just at the foot of the mountains, and about three hundred miles from this place. That taken and we will have in possession, or at least in our power the whole of the Mexican territory East of the Mountains and it is to be presumed Mexico will then soon come to terms. I do not feel my Dear Julia the slightest apprehention as to our sucsess in evry large battle that we may have with the enemy no matter how superior they may be to us in numbers. I expect soon to see Fred. here to join us in the invasion of Mexico. I see that his promotion to the 5th Inf.y was confirmed a month ago at Washington. I have no doubt he will be very glad to get away from Towson[.] 1 Possibly too John Dent may be coming here as a Captain in a new Regiment. Before you get this letter Julia you will probably see or hear of Cap.t Morrison and Lt. Wallens return to the U. States. They have been sent on the recruiting service and will not probably return until next Fall. From the papers we recieve from the States one would judge that there is great excitement about us there, but believe me my Dear Julia you need not feel

-90-

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