The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview

as a conquering force. From my experience I judge the latter much the most probable. —How pleasant it would be now for me to spend a day with you at White Haven. I envy you all very much, but still hope on that better times are coming. Remember me to all at White Haven and write very soon and very often to

ULYSSES
Julia

ALS, DLC-USG, "Pt Isabel July 30," 1846, on envelope sheet.

1.
Gen. Mariano Paredes y Arrillaga had deposed and replaced José Herrera as President of Mexico on Jan. 4, 1846, because of Herrera's willingness to negotiate with the United States. As Mexican arms suffered reverses, threats of revolt increased. It was announced, erroneously, that Paredes was leading an expedition against the American army. Actually, Paredes turned over the manage- ment of affairs to Vice President Bravo, also believed to favor negotiations. Before anything could come of the plans of Paredes or Bravo, they were over- thrown by a revolution led by Antonio L6pez de Santa Anna.

To Julia Dent

Matamoras Mexico
Aug. 4th 1846

MY DEAREST JULIA

I have just recieved a letter from you, the first for about a month, and you deserve a very short one in answer for not writing sooner. My Regiment is all in Camargo with the exception of two Companies. They went up by water. My comp.y and one other of the 4th Inf.y and two of the 3d Inf.y were retained to

escort a battery of Artillery by land through all the mud and water, and you may depend there is no scarsity of it. It will take us about ten days to get there and then I will be so far separated from my Dear Julia that you need not look for a letter for one month after this, but my next will be a long one. It is now after [noon] and I have to go to town yet to [mail] this and for other business so tha[t you] must be satisfied with a very [short]

-103-

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