The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview

He was riding through Monteray and his horse fell with him and fractured his scull. His life is dispaired of.

U

ALS, DLC-USG.

1.
See letter of Sept. 23, 1846.
2.
In his Memoirs I, 52, USG mistakenly says that his journal was lost when his belongings were packed at Jefferson Barracks for the move to Camp Salubrity. He adds: "Often since a fear has crossed my mind lest that book might turn up yet, and fall into the hands of some malicious person who would publish it." It has not turned up yet.
3.
Seven lines crossed out.
4.
Capt. Samuel Hamilton Walker of Tex., who led the Texas Mounted Rifles, was killed Oct. 9, 1847, in the battle of Huamantla.
5.
Bvt. Capt. Randolph Ridgely died Oct. 27, 1846. See Maj. Gen. Zachary Taylor to AG, Oct. 28, 1846, HED, 30-1, 60, pp. 433-34.

To Julia Dent

Camp Near Monteray Mexico
November 7th 1846

MY DEAR JULIA

I got one of the sweetest letters from you a few days ago that I have had for a long time and the least I can do in return is to write you at least three pages in, return; even if I have nothing more to write than that I love you, and how very much. I have written very often to you since the battle of Monteray and intend to continue to do so, but still I hope that I may have but few more letters to write you. How happy I should be if I knew that but a very few more letters were to pass between my Dearest Julia and myself, as mere lovers,-that is to say, how happy I should be if soon Julia was to become mine forever. You say in your letter that you wish it was our country that was being invaded instead of Mexico, that you would ask for quarters but doubted if Mr. Grant would grant them. Indeed dearest I am one of the most humane individuals you are acquainted with, and

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 458

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.