The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview

To Julia Dent

Tacubaya Mexico
May 7th 1848

DEAREST JULIA

I have not recieved a letter from you for two months or more until two days ago, but when one did come it was most welcom. It has been a good while since I wrote to you but I can easily explain the reason. On the 3d of April I started with a party to go to the top of Popocatapetl the highest mountain in North America. From the mountain a portion of us went across into the Valley of Cuernavaca to visit the great mammoth cave of Mexico. On this trip I was absent from Mexico sixteen days and in the mean time a mail went off. The day after my return another mail started but I did not hear of it until I saw it leaving, so you see my dearest Julia you cannot attach any criminality to my apparent neglect. What must I think of you. just think two long months without hearing from one that I love so much. 1 Well I do not blame you 2 so long as you dont forget me and love me as you say you do.

There is a great deal of talk of peace here now. The knowing ones say that the Mexican Congress will ratify the terms proposed and that the advance of the American Army will be on its way for Vera Cruz in three weeks. 3 I atleast hope dear Julia that it will not be long before I can see you again. It is too bad aint it ? just think we have been engaged almost four years and have met but once in that time, that was three years ago.

I see Fred almost evry day. I told him what you desired me to. Fred read me a little of Miss Ellen's letter 4

The trip to the snow mountain and to the cave was very pleasant and would have been more so had we succeeded in geting to the top, but the weather was so unfavorable that all failed. The day that we arrived at the foot of the mountain we ascended about one half of the way to the top and there encamped for the night. We had been there but a short time when it began to blow

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 458

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.