The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview

ALS, DNA, RG 92, Letters Received, Clothing. On Jan. 23, 1849, Bvt. Maj. Gen. Thomas S. Jesup replied, "I have to acknowledge your letter of the 15th inst. I cannot decide 'whether or not the purchase of Bed Sacks for the Troops at your post be a proper Disbursement' until it is satisfactorily explained to me why those Troops were not supplied with their Clothing and Equipage on their passage through New York. The Clothing Depot being at Philadelphia every article required by the Troops could have been supplied to them during the time they were in N. Y. Harbour" Copy, ibid., Letters Sent, Clothing. See letter of Jan. 30, 1849.


To Bvt. Maj. Gen. Thomas S. Jesup

Madison Barracks
Sackets Harbor N. Y.
January 19th 1849

GEN.

I would respectfully represent to you that the fences in rear of the officers quarters at this post are in a very dilapidated condition, the most of them having fallen down or are sustained by props. I understand that they were built in 1819 since which time but little repairs have been put upon them.

There is 1158 feet of fencing, 8 feet high which would require 9264 feet of plank, 927 posts, and 2316 feet of Scantling. —I would respectfully ask if the Qr. Master General will authorize the purchase of lumber to make the above repairs.

The Eave troughs and leaders on the quarters of officers and soldiers are leaky and in many places broken causing, in wet weather, damage to the Public buildings.

I am Gen.
Your very Obt. Svt.
U. S. GRANT
To Gen. T. S. Jesup 1st Lt. 4th Inf.y
Qr. Mr. Gen. U. S. A. Reg. 1 Q. M.

ALS, DNA, RG 92, Consolidated Correspondence 598. For the reply, see next letter.

-170-

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