The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview
1.
The 4th Inf. arrived at Governors Island on June 17, 1852.
2.
Lt. Col. Benjamin L. E. Bonneville.
3.
For previous correspondence on this subject, see June 27, 1848, and for further mention see June 28, 1852.
4.
The city of Cincinnati.
5.
All wives of officers of the 4th Inf.
6.
2nd Lt. Benjamin D. Forsythe of Ill., USMA 1848.
7.
1st Lt. DeLancey Floyd-Jones of N. Y., USMA 1846, graduated under the name of Jones and added a hyphen later.
8.
Bvt. Maj. Granville Owen Haller of Pa.

To Julia Dent Grant

Fort Columbus, Governer's Island N. Y.
June 24th 1852

MY DEAREST JULIA.

It is time now to write my second letter for this week but I must confess that there is but little to write about. I generally go to the city evry day but as I have business with the Quarter Master there I do not get to see much of the city. The other evening I went to see the trained animals you heard me reading about before you left Sackets Harbor. Their performances are truly wonderfull. The monkeys are dressed like men & women, set up and take tea like other persons, with monkeys to wait on the table; they go riding on horseback and in a coach, with dogs for horses, a monkey driving and another acting as footman. During their drive a wheel comes off the carriage and they have an upset. The driver immediately rushes for the dog's heads, who act as if they were making desperate efforts to run away— and seizes each by the bit and holds them while the footman gets the wheel that come off and brings it to the carriage to be put on again. All this and many other tricks sufficient to fill up an evening they do apparently understanding all the time what they are about. I forgot to say in the begining that I recieved youre note from Cincinnati punctually when due. I was very glad to hear that you had got through without accident to yourself or Fred.

-237-

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