The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: 1837-1861 - Vol. 1

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview
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To Julia Dent Grant

Columbia Barracks W. T.
June 15th 1853

I have just returned from Calafornia and found three long sweet letters from you; one of March, (no date) April 10th and 25th In all of them you speak so highly of our dear little boys, as in fact do all the letters I get from my home. I got one from Jenny and Molly 1 in which they speak almost as much of them as you do. They say that father has gone to Galena and will stop to see Fred. That he thinks the country does not afford another like him. —When they wrote father had not yet returned and of course I heard nothing of the proposition to have me resign that you spoke of. I shall weigh the matter well before I act. If I could only remain here it would be hard to get me to leave the army. Whilst in Cal. I made such arrangements as would enable me to do a conciderable business, in a commission way, if I could but stay.

I have been quite unfortunate lately. The Columbia is now far over its banks, and

has destroyed all the grain, onions, corn. and about half the potatoes upon which I had expended so much money and labor. The wood which I had on the bank of the river had all to be removed, at an expense, and will all have to be put back again at an expense.

You ask about Mr. Camp. Poor fellow he could not stand prosperity. He was making over $1000 00 per month and it put him beside himself. From being generous he grew parsimonious and finally so close that apparently he could not bear to let money go to keep up his stock of goods. He quit and went home with about $8000.00 decieving me as to the money he had and owing me about $800 00. I am going to make out his account and send it to Chas. Ford 2 for collection. I will some day tell you all the particulars of this transaction. I do not like to put it upon paper.

I got the lock of Ulys.s hair you send and kissed it. I dreamed of seeing you, Fred. and Ulys. night before last. I thought Fred.

-301-

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