The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview
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ment to report to that body the quantity and kind of muskets now in possession of the authorities of this State, whether the same be capable of being rifled, as is now being done by the United States at Pittsburgh, with similar arms, and what is the probable value and efficiency of muskets, so rifled, I have the honor to transmit herewith to your body the report of Capt. U. S. Grant, who was specially detailed by this Department to make the examination required by said resolution." Ibid. The resolution had been introduced by E. G. Johnson, representing Peoria and Stark counties. Ibid., pp. 37-38. USG's letter was also printed in the Missouri Republican, May 1, 1861, attributed to "N. S. Grant." See letter of May 1, 1861, note 3.

To Mary Grant
Springfield, April 29th, 1861
DEAR SISTER;

I come to this place several days ago fully expecting to find a letter here for me from father. 1 As yet I have rec'd none. It was my intention to have returned to Galena last evening but the Governer detained, and I presume will want me to remain with him, until all the troops now called into service, or to be so called, are fully mustered in and completely organized. 2 The enthusiasm through this state surpasses anything that could have been imagined three weeks ago. Only six Regiments are called for here while at least thirty could be promptly raised. The Governer, and all others in authority, are harrassed from morning until night with Patriotic men, and such political influance as they can bring, to obtain first promises of acceptance of their companies if there should be another call for troops. The eagerness to enter companies that were accepted by the Governer was so great that it has been impossible for commanders of companies to keep their numbers within the limits of the law consequently companies that have arrived here have all had from ten to sixty men more than can be accepted. The Legislature on Saturday last passed a bill providing for the maintenance and discipline of these surplus troops for one month, unless sooner mustered into service of the United States under a second call. 3I am convinced that if the South knew the entire unanimity of the

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