The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview

J. G. Cramer, pp. 27-30. The first page is reproduced in the catalogue of the J. H. Benton sale, American Art Association, March 12, 1920. Mary Grant was the youngest sister of USG.

1.
The letter was requested in USG's letter of April 21, 1861. It arrived the same day USG mailed this letter. See letter of May 2, 1861.
2.
In his letter of April 27, USG spoke of the intention of Governor Richard Yates to have him drill the vols. at Camp Yates. What had changed these plans is unknown, but there may be a clue in a resolution introduced in the Ill. House of Representatives on April 26 by William C. Harrington of Adams County authorizing the state adjt. gen. to secure the services of three men as drill officers at Camp Yates. USG was not one of the persons named. Journal of the House of Representatives of the Twenty-Second General Assembly of the State of Illinois at their Second Session ... (Springfield, 1861), p. 24.
3.
See letter of April 27, 1861, note 3.
4.
Rachel B. Grant, youngest of the nine children of Noah Grant, sister of Jesse Root Grant, married William Tompkins of Charleston in what is now W. Va. According to J. G. Cramer, p. 27, in the letter referred to by USG, Rachel Tompkins had asserted: "If you are with the accursed Lincolnites, the ties of consanguinity shall be forever severed." Although the letter to USG's oldest sister, Clara Grant, referred to by USG is not available in full, a long letter of June 5 has been printed. This letter was undoubtedly written by Rachel Tompkins, although signed "The Secretary of Your Aunt Rachel." In this letter the southern cause is defended and Lincoln condemned vigorously. "Mrs. Tompkins says," reports her secretary, "that if you can justify your Bro. Ulysses in drawing his sword against those connected by the ties of blood, and even boast of it, you are at liberty to do so, but she can not." Ibid., pp. 159-82.
5.
Jesse Root Grant, Jr., youngest child of USG, was born Feb. 6, 1858.
6.
See letter of April 21, 1861, note 4.
7.
Jesse Root Grant was then sixty-seven years old.
8.
Samuel Simpson Grant, oldest brother of USG, had been ill with tubercu- losis for some time. PUSG, 1, 347n, 350, 356. He died in Sept., 1861.

To Julia Dent Grant

GENERAL HEAD QUARTERS—STATE OF ILLINOIS.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
SPRINGFIELD, May 1st 1861.

DEAR JULIA;

I have an opportunity of sending a letter direct to Galena by Mr. Corwith 1 and as it will probably reach you a day or two earlyer than if sent by Mail I avail myself of the chance. I enclose

-15-

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