The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview
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To Capt. John C. Kelton
Head Quarters, Ironton Mo.
August 12th 1861
CAPT. J. C. KELTON, ASST. ADJT. GEN. U. S. A.
ST. Louis Mo.

Since my report of yesterday my scouts have returned from towards Brunot, having penetrated as far south as where the enemies most advanced Pickets had occupied the night before. All had left and from the best information received two forces are moving, one as if to come in upon the railroad from the West the other from the East.

Magrauding bands are still reported on the road from Potosi to Calidonia, and further South. Tomorrow I shall have a party in pursuit of them.

Yesterday quite a party of horsemen were within seven miles south of here, on a road West of the one leading to Brunot, but could not be found this morning.

Without Cavelry it is impossible to pursue these bands with any prospect of overtaking them, and with the amount of Picket,

fatigue, Guard and other duty that must necessarily be performed, it is difficult to spare men for these scouts.

To-day my Guards detained the mail coming in and I have stoped the delivery of letters to a few suspected persons, and the forwarding of six packages of letters, as follows: four to points in Arkansas, one to Memphis, via Little Rock, & one to Brunot. These will be detained awaiting the decission of the Department Commander thereon.

I am entirely without orders for my guidance in matters like the above and without recent Acts of Congress which bear upon them.

I would respectfully urge the necessity of forwarding to this point say forty complete teams. About one hundred good & well

-102-

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