The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview
To Mary Grant
Ironton Mo.
August 12th 1861
DEAR SISTER;

Your letter directed to me at Mexico, Mo. come to hand yesterday at this place. A glance at the map will show you where I am. When I come here it was reported that this place was to be attacked by 8,000 secessionests, under Gen. Hardee, within a day or two. 1 Now Hardee's force seems to have reduced and his distance from here to have increased. Scouting parties however are constantly seen within a few miles of our Pickets. I have here about 3000 Vols. nearly all Infantry, but our position being strong and our cause a good one, it would trouble a much larger force of the enemy to dislodge us. —You ask my views about the continuance of the war &c. Well I have changed my mind so much that I dont know what to think. That the Rebels will be so badly whipped by April next that they cannot make a stand anywhere I dont doubt. But they are so dogged that there is no telling when they may be subdued. Send Union troops among them and respect all their rights, pay for evrything you get and they become desperate and reckless because their state sovereignty is invaded. Troops of the opposite side march through and take evrything they want, leaving no pay but script, and they become desperate secession partisans because they have nothing more to loose. Evry change makes them more desperate. I should like to be sent to Western Virginia but my lot seems to be cast in this part of the world. I wanted to remain in St. Louis a day or two to get some books to read that might help me in my profession, and get my uniform &c. made. 2 Mine has been a busy life from the begining and my new made friends in Ill. seem to give me great credit. I hope to deserve it and shall spare no pains on my part to do so.

It is precious little time I shall have for writing letters but I have subscribed for the Daily St. Louis Democrat 3 to be sent to

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 399

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.