The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview
To Capt. Speed Butler
Headquarters U. S. Forces.
Jefferson City Mo, Aug 23 '61
CAPTAIN SPEED BUTLER
ST LOUIS Mo.

Since my last report the 25th Illinois Regt Col Coles 1 commanding, and seven companies of the 1st Illinois Cavalry, have reached here.

I telegraphed you yesterday 2 the precarious condition Lexington 3 was in, and of the expedition I was fitting out for the relief of that point. As the gentleman from whom I got my information, (Mr Silver) called upon you, it is not necessary that I should enter into particulars. Col Marshal goes in command of the expedition, taking with him all his own command, about three hundred homeguards and a section of Taylor's Battery, 4 should it arrive in time. They will subsist off the country through which they pass under full instructions.

I am not fortifying here at all. With the picket guard and other duty coming upon the men of this command there is but little time left for drilling. Drill and discipline is more necessary for the men than fortifications. Another difficulty in the way of fortifying is that I have no Engineer officer to direct it, no time to attend to it myself, and very little disposition to gain a "Pillow notoriety" 5 for a branch of service that I have forgotten all about. 6

I have nothing from west of here since my telegram of yesterday, but shall have today. Will telegraph if any thing of importance should be learned. As soon as possible I will send you a consolidated morning report, and will try and keep this command in such condition, as to enable me to have a report made when called for.

There are no county-maps published for this section of the state, nor any thing to point out the different roads and travelled routes more distinctly than the State-maps you have. 7 I can

-131-

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