The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2

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in my charge several prisners of war recieved from Col. Marsh and one arrested by & recieved from Genl. Prentiss with indeffinite and untenible charges as I am not able (knowing as little as I do of the whereabouts of or names of witnesses against them to proceed with much certainty. Among the number is Major Beatty of Jackson & a rebel capt Woods the latter arrested by order of Genl. Prentiss and detained without trial until now, with your permission I would like to bring them before you for investigation, but if you direct I can examine them and if they return to their allegiance under the proclamation discharge them. I am told the most if not all already desire to do so. I am gratified to communicate the fact that all is peacefull & quiet here and secession sentiment in this immediate vicinity is decreasing. I should be greatly pleased to have you at your leisure visit the Post and receive instructions from you—You would greatly oblige me by the issue of an order upon my Reg. the 7th Ills to the commandants of companies to fill their companies within a certain time or compel them to give way to full companies that are and have been waiting to join the Regt. all have had an abundance of time allowed them for this purpose and a non compliance has not only rendered the Regt. inefficient, but the order for equalization of companies taking from active officers men for even temporary use of Lazy ones is tending to a demoralization of the whole. Your early attention to this matter which is for the best interests of the service is earnistly desired." LS, DNA, RG 393, District of Southeast Mo., Letters Received.

1.
In a proclamation of Aug. 30, Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont established martial law in Mo. and declared that property of actively disloyal persons would be confiscated. Slaves of such persons were "hereby declared freemen." O. R., I, iii, 466-67. Because Frémont's proclamation involved emancipation, it had wide- spread political repercussions, and contributed to his eventual removal from com- mand of the Western Dept.
To Col. Richard J. Oglesby
Head Quarters Dist S. E. Mo
Cairo Sept 12th 1861
COL

You will continue to occupy Norfolk. Throw out Pickets to keep you constantly informed of the movements of the enemy but make no movements with the main body of your command without further instructions unless it should be necessary for protection.

Your whole command should have their baggage with them and I gave directions to that effect yesterday.

-245-

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