The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2

By John Y. Simon | Go to book overview

Have delivered to Col Waagner the accompanying orders I direct him to come here and report to me for other service

U. S. GRANT
Brig Genl Comdg
To Col Oglesby
Comdg
Norfolk Mo

Copies, DLC-USG, V, 1, 2, 3, 77; DNA, RG 393, USG Letters Sent. O. R., I, iii, 489. O. R. identifies the letter to Col. John Cook of Sept. 12, 1861, as an enclosure in the letter to Col. Richard J. Oglesby, but gives no explanation. On Sept. 12, Oglesby wrote to USG. "I have just returned from a march of four miles inland from Norfolk, in the direction of the enemy. I find the country thickly wooded but cut by several fit for artillery to approach for the marshes are substantially dry, not affected by the late rain to impede the march of an army. The two bridges destroyed some days ago are of no consequence, as the sloughs are passable at several points near there. Lieut—Tuffts was directed to approach the lines of the enemies pickets of this side of the Hunter farm. He has about 25 Cavalry men with him. Will be in tonight if anything important is reported will inform you" ALS, DNA, RG 393, District of Southeast Mo., Letters Received.

To Julia Dent Grant
Cairo, Sept. 12th 1861
DEAR JULIA,

I have been intending to send for you to come here but now things begin to look so much like a fight that I hardly think it would be prudent. The Rebels are in large force and we are near enough to have little brushes occationally with our Gun Boats and scouting parties.

Yesterday we had quite a little brush all day, resulting however in only two wounded on our side. 1 To-day some of our scouts picked up a paper printed in New Madrid in which they acknowledge 68 killed, their Gun Boat and three pieces of Artillery disabled, and many men wounded.

To-day they have not come out. I should like very much to have you here but I am afraid that it might embarass my movements.

-246-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: April-September 1861 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 399

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.