The Household Knights of King John

By S. D. Church | Go to book overview

6
JOHN's HOUSEHOLD KNIGHTS DURING
THE MINORITY OF HENRY III

Amongst those gathered around King John's death-bed to witness the terms of his last will and testament were the men who were to become the key players in the minority government. Guala, the papal legate, who was to play a central role in establishing Henry III securely on his throne; Peter des Roches, bishop of Winchester, who was to be the young king's tutor in his early years; William Marshal, the earl of Pembroke, who was to be Henry's regent; Ranulf, earl of Chester, considered by some as a possible alternative as regent to the earl Marshal; William Brewer, who was also destined to be a major player in the minority government; and Falkes de Bréauté, the royal steward. Absent from this list of John's foremost supporters gathered around his death-bed was, of course, Hubert de Burgh, at that time holed up in Dover castle which he dare not leave given its importance to the safety of the realm; but he, too, was to have a significant role to play in the new minority government.1 It was these men who in the first years of the reign were to bring the civil war to its conclusion and to begin the process of reestablishing royal rule in England. And it was these men who determined the composition of the body of milites defamilia regis during the minority years.

The first notice that we have of the new king's knightly establishment occurs in the close rolls for the end of November 1217. Here the regent gave orders for seven knights of the king's household to receive robes of green or brown, presumably for the celebrations that must have greeted the end of Henry's first year as king.2 The names of five of these seven

____________________
1
For all these men see Carpenter, Minority. Sometimes more specifically, but not always so, see: N. C. Vincent, ed., The Letters and Charters of Cardinal Guala Bicchieri, Papal Legate in England, 1216–1218 (Canterbury and York Society, 83, 1996), pp. xxxviii-lviii; Vincent, Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester 1205 -38: an Alien in English Politics (Cambridge, 1996); Crouch, William Marshal, pp. 117–32; J. W. Alexander, Ranulf of Chester: a Relic of the Conquest, (Athens, GA, 1983), pp. 69–91; Turner, Men Raisedfrom the Dust, pp. 71–90.
2
Rot. Litt. Claus., i, p. 345 b.

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Household Knights of King John
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 177

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.