The Saga of Anthropology in China: From Malinowski to Moscow to Mao

By Gregory Eliyu Guldin | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Chapter 11

The Return of Foreign
Anthropologies?

The Third Plenum of the Eleventh Party Congress, held in December 1978, marks the break with the era of the Gang of Four and the start of the halting emancipation of the social sciences. After a twenty-year chill, the academic atmosphere turned warmer in the late 1970s as economic and political pressures moved China along new paths. For the anthropological sciences, rebirth and revitalization would lead scholars to ponder once again the old questions of models, referents, and indigenization. Having gone through eras of first Western, then Soviet, and finally Maoist models of their disciplines, how would the new reform context shape their fields?

The guidelines for the era of reform were to be "the Four Cardinal Principles" of upholding the socialist road, the dictatorship of the proletariat, the leadership of the Communist Party, and the preeminence of Marxism-Leninism /Mao Zedong Thought. This had not changed from all previous post-Liberation eras. The Party was proceeding cautiously in its liberalization efforts, as reflected in its slogan for the times: "Guan Er Bu Si; Huo Er Bu Luan" ("Controlled But Not Dead; Lively But Not Wild"). The trend toward greater freedom in expression and research, however, quickly gathered strength in the early 1980s, so by 1983 Tang Tsou could write, "The social standing of all specialists in China in all fields is now higher than at any time since 1949, and their impact on policies is also much greater" (Tang 1983:63).

Hu Qiaomu, the head of the Party's Propaganda Department, had been appointed to lead the new CASS in 1979, and by February 1980 he had become a

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Saga of Anthropology in China: From Malinowski to Moscow to Mao
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?