Sly and Able: A Political Biography of James F. Byrnes

By David Robertson | Go to book overview

15

Politics
and the Bomb

"Dear Harry," Jimmy Byrnes in Spartanburg, South Carolina, began a telegram he sent to the nation's new president the evening of April 12, 1945. "I will be [at the] Office [of War] Mobilization tomorrow. If I can be of service, call on me." Byrnes found no inappropriateness in sending a telegram to the new thirty-third president of the United States familiarly addressed as "Harry." After all, less than nine months earlier, the junior senator Harry Truman had come to Byrnes' hotel suite and rehearsed for Byrnes the speech he had expected to deliver in Chicago nominating Byrnes for the vice presidency. And from another historical perspective, Jimmy Byrnes in the hectic hours after FDR's death on April 12, can perhaps be forgiven for writing to Harry S. Truman in a familiar, and possibly slightly patronizing, manner. On the afternoon that Franklin Roosevelt died, the former "assistant president" was in possession of a crucial fact that he knew was unknown to Truman: that the United States was manufacturing the world's first atomic bomb.

Truman first heard of the bomb's existence the same night that Byrnes sent his telegram to the White House, when Secretary of War Henry Stimson stayed behind after a brief meeting in the Cabinet Room following

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sly and Able: A Political Biography of James F. Byrnes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Sly and Able - A Political Biography of James F. Byrnes *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Introduction - Jimmy, You'Re Close to Me Personally. *
  • Part One - Political Fathers: Learning the Craft 1882-1930 *
  • 1 - Can Anything Good Come Out of Charleston? *
  • 2 - Pitchfork Ben Tillman *
  • 3 - Dear Mr. Baruch *
  • Part Two - The Inheritance: the Senate and Beyond 1931-1941 *
  • 4 - Fixer from the Palmetto State *
  • 5 - The General Textile Strike of 1934 *
  • 6 - The Philadelphia Story *
  • 7 - A Vast Empire Nearby *
  • 8 - They Were Utterly Deceived *
  • 9 - Jumping the Traces *
  • 10 - The Purge of 1938 *
  • 11 - Justice Byrnes and the Coming of War *
  • Part Three - Leaving His Father's House 1942-1972 *
  • 12 - The Assistant President *
  • 13 - The Convention of 1944 *
  • 14 - Roosevelt's Last Gift *
  • 15 - Politics and the Bomb *
  • 16 - The Street to Hiroshima *
  • 17 - Rocking the Boat with Truman *
  • 18 - Iranian Winter and a Cold Warrior *
  • 19 - A Disquisition on Government *
  • 20 - South Carolina Coda *
  • Bibliography *
  • Notes *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 639

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.