The Political Economy of International Trade Law: Essays in Honor of Robert E. Hudec

By Daniel L. M. Kennedy; James D. Southwick | Go to book overview

FOREWORD
E. THOMAS SULLIVAN
DEAN AND WILLIAM S. PATTEE PROFESSOR OF LAW, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA LAW SCHOOL

It was a great privilege for the University of Minnesota Law School to host a global conference on “The Political Economy of International Trade Law” on campus on September 15–16, 2000 in honor of our colleague Professor Robert E. Hudec, who was retiring after twenty-eight years on the University of Minnesota law faculty. This volume is a result of the intellectual exchange and energy that occurred during the conference.

Although this volume analyzes the historical and current issues affecting the World Trade Organization specifically and international trade in general, its production could not have occurred without the leadership and intellectual commitment of Professor Robert Hudec. Professor Hudec, the author of six leading books and over thirty-five articles and monographs on international trade, joined the University of Minnesota Law faculty in 1972. Previously, he had been a member of the Yale University Law faculty; a Rockefeller Foundation Research Fellow in the Office of General Agreements on Tariff and Trade, in Geneva, Switzerland; and Assistant General Counsel, Office of Special Trade Representatives for Trade Negotiations, in Washington, DC. Earlier, he had clerked for the Honorable Potter Stewart on the United States Supreme Court. Although making his academic home at the University of Minnesota for nearly thirty years, Professor Hudec also held visiting faculty appointments at Stanford University, the University of Texas, Cornell University Law School, the University of Toronto, the Kiel Institute for World Economics, and the Université Jean Moulin, Lyon, France.

This volume teaches, as does Professor Hudec's own scholarship, that one cannot understand or appreciate international trade law, or the law and institutions of the World Trade Organization, without understanding the culture, environment, and political economy of the member states that make up the international trade community. From the issues of “structure” to the day-to-day application of trade laws and policies, this volume is unique in its positive and normative analysis of the political economy of international trade law today.

We salute Professor Hudec for his lifelong contributions to this important body of scholarship and to his many colleagues throughout the world who came to the University of Minnesota for this conference, and now in this volume offer their professional salute and best wishes to Bob Hudec, certainly one of the foremost authorities in the world on international trade.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of International Trade Law: Essays in Honor of Robert E. Hudec
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 696

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.