The Political Economy of International Trade Law: Essays in Honor of Robert E. Hudec

By Daniel L. M. Kennedy; James D. Southwick | Go to book overview

COMMENT
It's elementary, my dear Abbott
FRED L. MORRISON

To be true to Sherlock Holmes, one must look for the most elementary causes. In Silver Blaze, Holmes noted that the dog had not barked when the horse Silver Blaze was abducted from the stable. So, Holmes concluded, the perpetrator had to have been one whom the dog trusted. By process of elimination, Holmes deduced that Straker, the horse's trainer (who had been killed on the night of the abduction, and thus escaped the suspicion of less talented investigators), was the only remaining possibility. A dog would not, of course, bark at its own master. When Holmes knew these facts and confirmed them with other clues, he concluded that the deceased Straker had, indeed, beenresponsible fortheabductionof Silver Blaze. Holmes, of course, always looked for the most elementary clues, and was not led astray by the merely apparent conclusions.

In their essay, Kenneth Abbott and Duncan Snidal explore why the WTO dog didn't bark on issues of trade-related corruption and foreign bribery.1 Like Dr. Watson and the hapless police inspectors, they don't look deep enough for the elementary clues.

Abbott and Snidal have a rather complex theory about why the WTO dog didn't bark. It has to do with varying coalitions which might have pursued the bribery and corruption issue through the trade organization, and why they didn't coalesce. This solution is full of logic, but overlooks a fundamental flaw. It doesn't understand the nature of the beast that should have barked. It has an air of inherent plausibility, yet it somehow fails to achieve the simplicity and elegance of the Sherlock Holmes solution.

The real cause that the dog didn't bark is, of course, elementary. It lies in the dog's breeding and training. The dog in Silver Blaze was a watch dog. He was trained to bark whenever any stranger entered the paddock or stable. But not all dogs are bred or trained to bark at strangers. Some dogs, like setters, are bred for hunting. Others are bred as watch dogs. Some are good with children. Some dogs, owned by the Customs Service, almost never bark, unless they smell illicit drugs.

My own dog, Fuzzball, is a bearded collie, a sheep dog. His sole concern in life is that none of his sheep leave the herd. It doesn't matter that we don't have any

____________________
1
Professor Abbott was the oral presenter of the paper at the conference. To maintain consistency with the style of A. Conan Doyle, the title of this response mentions only one name. There is no intention to distinguish between the co-authors and both are included in all subsequent references.

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of International Trade Law: Essays in Honor of Robert E. Hudec
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 696

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.