PATRIFIED MUMMIES AND
MUMMIFIED DADDIES: A STUDY
OF MATRIARCHS AND
PATRIARCHS IN CANADIAN
PRAIRIE FICTION

David C. Carpenter

This chapter is a discussion of the ways in which some of our most distinguished writers have talked about men and women. Among our own settlement fiction, a few books are destined to stay with us long after their creators have passed on. But much of our settlement fiction is doomed to a very short life indeed. One of the reasons that enduring novels are praised by generations upon generations of readers is that the people in them live in the mind's eye and seem to bespeak certain realities that are contained in all of us. The Tom Joneses, the Sam Slicks, the Huck Finns, the Sara Mondays, Becky Sharps, and Uriah Heeps do more than satisfy the intellectual's demand for historical accuracy. They affect us.

Much of our own settlement fiction may be faithful to the region it describes. But if it is to affect us, it will do so in ways which transcend merely regional considerations. Grove's Settlers of the Marsh seems destined to be with us for a long time, for instance. But its success hardly seems to have much to do with Grove's knowledge of rural Manitoba settlement history, or his encyclopedic knowledge of farm machinery, or his agricultural background. Most of us would agree that it has much to do with his creation of people like Niels Lindstedt. In fact, it is likely that the book's enduring qualities reside in the often tragic and occasionally beautiful details of Lindstedt's relationships with Mrs. Lund, Clara, and Ellen. For instance, Grove's creation of Clara, the dark woman, and Ellen, the creature of light, as projections of Niels Lindstedt's love, is at times a fascinating account. The two women provide an illumination into Niels' conflict

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Settlement of the West
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 271

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.