Footprints in the Jungle: Natural Resource Industries, Infrastructure, and Biodiversity Conservation

By Ian A. Bowles; Glenn T. Prickett et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

NOTES
1
Meadows et al. (1972). The model projected that if the world economy continued to expand over the following fifty years as the economy of the United States had over the fifty previous years, then the entire system would collapse through the exhaustion of the supply of crucial materials and pollution from the massive increase in materials-intensive industrial production.
2
The 1987 Brundtland Report of the World Commision on Environment and Development defined sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Implicit in this definition are the following ideas: (1) environmental matters should be incorporated into economic policies; and (2) economic development should promote intergenerational and geographical equity. Sustainable development has been discussed in detail by many academics including: Jacobs (1991), Pearce et al. (1989), Pezzey (1989), and Redclift (1987).
3
Those ecosystem services and functions used in this study include: gas regulation, climate regulation, disturbance regulation, water regulation, water supply, erosion control and sediment retention, soil formation, nutrient cycling, waste treatment, pollination, biological control, refugia, food production, raw materials, genetic resources, recreation, and cultural services. Ecosystem “goods” were included with ecosystem services.
4
The objective of this project is to promote environmentally sensitive practices in the development of nonrenewable natural resources and to contribute to the development of mechanisms and methodological tools that enhance the well-being of communities affected by mining projects. This project is being undertaken by the Mining and Energy Research Network at the University of Warwick, United Kingdom, Tata Energy Research Institute (TERI), in New Dehli, India, and Institut National del environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), in Bogota, Colombia.
5
CI first conducted the “hotspot analysis” in 1990. It was reviewed and updated in 1996. Designation as a biodiversity hotspot is based on two criteria: the number of endemic species an ecosystem contains and the degree of threat it faces. Despite occupying less than 2 percent of the Earth's land area, the hotspots contain more than 40 percent of terrestrial species that exist nowhere else (endemics).

REFERENCES

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1989. “Toxicological Profile for Arsenic. Draft. U. S. Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Ga. http://atsdr1.atsdr.cdc.gov

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1992. “Toxicological Profile for Mercury. Draft. U. S. Public Health Service, U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Ga. http://atsdr1.atsdr.cdc.gov

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 1993. Toxicological Profile for Fluorides, Hydrogen Fluoride and Fluorine. U. S. Public Health Service, U. S. Department of

-200-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Footprints in the Jungle: Natural Resource Industries, Infrastructure, and Biodiversity Conservation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 332

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?