Play, Death, and Heroism in Shakespeare

By Kirby Farrell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

For encouragement and wholesome scolding I am grateful to Rick Abrams, John Blanpied, Arthur Kinney, Mimi Sprengnether, and Jim Calderwood, who has himself lately begun to explore the crooked passages beneath the cloud-capped towers of heroism (Shakespeare and the Denial of Death, 1987). Some of this book was written while I was teaching at the University of Freiburg, aided by a grant from the Max Kade Foundation. The Graduate Research Council at the University of Massachusetts assisted me on several occasions, and the English Department has been unfailingly supportive.

In other forms Chapter 2 appears in Shakespeare Studies 16 (1984): 75-99, while Chapter 9 appears in Shakespeare Studies 19 (1987): 17-40 (reprinted by permission of the editors). Chapter 8, "Love, Death, and Patriarchy in Romeo and Juliet," also appears in Shakespeare's Personality, edited by Sidney Homan, Norman Holland, and Bernard Paris (Berkeley, Cal.: University of California Press, 1989).

Some of the book's arguments originated as papers presented before the New England Renaissance Society (1977); the 1978 MLA session on "Marriage and the Family in Shakespeare"; the 1983 and 1984 Themes in Drama Conferences at the University of California at Riverside ; the 1985 conference on "Shakespeare's Personality" at the University of Florida, Gainesville; the International Shakespeare Society (1986); the 1988 Buffalo Symposium on Language and Literature; and the Fifth European-American Conference on Literature and Psychoanalysis (1988).

-xi-

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Play, Death, and Heroism in Shakespeare
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Play, Death, and Heroism in Shakespeare *
  • Contents *
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One *
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2 - Play-Death, Self-Effacement, and Autonomy 13
  • Chapter 3 - Play, Death, and Apotheosis 36
  • Chapter 4 - Heroism and Hero Worship 56
  • Chapter 5 - The Hero and the Tomb 74
  • Chapter 6 - The Topography of Death and Heroism 90
  • Part Two *
  • Chapter 7 - Love, Death, and the Hunt in Venus and Adonis 117
  • Chapter 8 - Love, Death, and Patriarchy in Romeo and Juliet 131
  • Chapter 9 - Prophecy and Heroic Destiny in the Histories 148
  • Chapter 10 - Play-Death and Individuation 172
  • Chapter 11 - Epilogue 192
  • Appendix 201
  • Notes 207
  • Index 231
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