3

The Model:
Rent Control in New York City

by Michael A. Stegman

At first, it seems absurd that New York City's experience with rent control and regulation is relevant to other communities considering the adoption of such ordinances. After all, New York has almost four times the proportion of units in multifamily structures (that is, with five units or more) as does the nation as a whole, and more than one-third of its apartments are in buildings containing at least fifty units. Two out of three households across the country own their homes but in New York less than three in ten do. In New York more than one in five homeowners lives in cooperatives or condominiums, while across the nation just one in forty does. In short, New York's housing situation seems unique enough to prevent it from being a model for other communities.

Regardless of these differences, New York's almost half century of experience with rent control and regulation has provided the model upon which others are built or against which they are contrasted. Its basic and generic features can be abstracted from the city's unique housing market. This chapter describes New York's situation and then extracts five key issues with which the city is concerned and from which other communities might learn: whether maximum permissible rent increases also become minimum rent increases; why moderate forms of rent regulation do not protect low- and moderate-income families from high rent burdens ; the relationship between rent control and underutilization of living space; the difficulty of determining the effects of regulation on the returns to housing suppliers; and rent control as a form of social planning.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rent Control Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Rent Control Debate *
  • Contents *
  • Tables *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - The Politics and Economics of Rent Control *
  • 2 - The Market Structure of the Rental Sector *
  • 3 - The Model: Rent Control in New York City *
  • 4 - Dispersion and Adaptation: the California Experience *
  • 5 - An Analysis of Intercity Rents *
  • 6 - Direct Effects of Undermaintenance and Deterioration *
  • 7 - Toward a Fuller Understanding of Rent Control *
  • Contributors *
  • Notes *
  • Selected Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 148

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.