The House of the Seven Gables

By A. Marion Merrill; Nathaniel Hawthorne | Go to book overview

VI
MAULE'S WELL

AFTER an early tea, the little country-girl strayed into the garden. The enclosure had formerly been very extensive, but was now contracted within small compass, and hemmed about, partly by high wooden fences, and partly by the outbuildings of houses that stood on another street. In its centre was a grass-plat, surrounding a ruinous little structure, which showed just enough of its original design to indicate that it had once been a summer- house. A hop-vine, springing from last year's root, was beginning to clamber over it, but would be long in covering the roof with its green mantle. Three of the seven gables either fronted or looked sideways, with a dark solemnity of aspect, down into the garden.

The black, rich soil had fed itself with the decay of a long period of time; such as fallen leaves, the petals of flowers, and the stalks and seed-vessels of vagrant and lawless plants, more useful after their death than ever while flaunting in the sun. The evil of these departed years would naturally have sprung up again, in such rank weeds (symbolic of the transmitted vices of society) as are always prone to root themselves about human dwellings. Phoœbe saw, however, that their growth must have been checked by a degree of careful labor, bestowed daily and systematically on the garden. The white double rose-bush had evidently been propped up anew against the house since

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The House of the Seven Gables
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • List of Characters viii
  • Introduction xi
  • Bibliography xviii
  • Chronological List of Hawthorne's Works xix
  • I - The Old Pyncheon Family 1
  • II - The Little Shop-Window 31
  • III - The First Customer 45
  • IV - A Day Behind the Counter 62
  • V - May and November 78
  • VI - Maule's Well 96
  • VII - The Guest 109
  • VIII - The Pyncheon of To-Day 128
  • IX - Clifford and Phoebe 148
  • X - The Pyncheon Garden 162
  • XI - The Arched Window 178
  • XII - The Daguerreotypist 194
  • XIII - Alice Pyncheon 210
  • XIV - Phœbe's Good-By 237
  • XV - The Scowl and Smile 250
  • XVI - Clifford's Chamber 269
  • XVII - The Flight of Two Owls 284
  • XVIII - Governor Pyncheon 301
  • XIX - Alice's Posies 320
  • XX - The Flower of Eden 339
  • XXI - The Departure 350
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