Veering Right: How the Bush Administration Subverts the Law for Conservative Causes

By Charles Tiefer | Go to book overview

Notes

1.
GETTING READY TO VEER RIGHT
1
William C. Berman, America's Right Turn: From Nixon to Clinton(2d ed. 1998).
2
See generally Jon. R. Bond & Richard Fleisher, eds., Polarized Politics: Congress and the President in a Partisan Era(2000).
3
For a conservative's favorable review of the Reagan administration's handling of legal affairs, see Terry Eastland, Energy in the Executive(1992).
4
Theodore J. Lowi, The End of the Republican Era (1995); Dan Balz & Ronald Brownstein, Storming the Gates: Protest Politic and the Republican Revival (1996); Douglas L. Koopman, Hostile Takeover: The House Republican Party, 1980–1995 (1996).
5
David W. Rohde, Parties and Leaders in the Postreform House(1991).
6
Ronald Radosh, Divided They Fell: The Demise of the Democratic Party, 1964–1996 (1996).
7
Nicol C. Rae, The Decline and Fall of the Liberal Republicans from 1952 to the Present(1989).
8
For a full treatment of this subject, see Charles Tiefer, Congressional Practice and Procedure(1989).
9
This theory has been most fully developed in a series of works by Aldrich and Rohde. A good overview is John H. Aldrich & David W. Rohde, The Logic of Conditional Party Government: Revisiting the Electoral Connection, in Lawrence C. Dodd & Bruce I. Oppenheimer, eds., Congress Reconsidered 269 (7th ed. 2001).
10
Charles Tiefer, Budgetized Health Entitlements and the Fiscal Constitution in Congress's 1995–1996 Budget Battle, 33 Harv. J. on Legis. 411 (1996).
11
The Republican Party fared worse in the 1998 elections than any outof-White-House party had done in a second-term midterm election in the previous century and a half. See Paul R. Abramson et al., Change and Continuity in the 1996 and 1998 Elections 252 (1999).

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