5

ASTROLOGICAL PRACTICE: CASTING A HOROSCOPE

INTRODUCTION: THE ASTROLOGERS

Astrology is a technically complex discipline, and the exposition in the foregoing chapter may have seemed baffling to the uninitiated. As one way of showing how it actually worked, I am going to take an individual birth chart and illustrate how two ancient astrologers would have interpreted it, according to the generalised instructions given in their works. They are quite different sources, in that they are separated by several centuries, and that one was written in Greek and the other in Latin. However, they are remarkably similar, illustrating the tenacity of astrological tradition. The reason that they are ideal for such an experiment is that they present themselves as simple handbooks, and offer precise predictions corresponding to particular configurations.

The first astrological work I use is the Mathesis, the Greek word meaning learning, which had come to connote astrological knowledge in particular. It was written by Firmicus Maternus, a Roman senator from Sicily who had been a lawyer, between 334 and 357 CE. He is thus a member of the Roman elite, and the work was dedicated to a patron high up in the imperial civil service, who is known to us from other evidence. The second work is the Pentateuch, or ‘work in five books’ by Dorotheus of Sidon, dated on the basis of the horoscopes to the mid-first century CE. This was in fact one of Firmicus’ sources. Though Dorotheus’ importance had long been known, only fragments of his original text were available until 1976. In that year David Pingree published the Arabic translation, which was based on a third-century Pahlavi translation of the Greek. This has had some obvious interpolations, two horoscopes from the third and fourth centuries CE, a couple of additions from Vettius Valens

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ancient Astrology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations viii
  • Preface xxiv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Historical Background: Mesopotamia, Egypt and Greece 9
  • 2 - Greece and Rome 32
  • 3 - The Triumph of Christianity 64
  • 4 - The Principles of Astrology 86
  • 5 - Astrological Practice: Casting a Horoscope 114
  • 6 - The Social World of the Astrologers 157
  • 7 - Reflections and Ramifications 179
  • Conclusion 208
  • Glossary 212
  • Notes 215
  • Bibliography 229
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.