The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style

By Markku Filppula | Go to book overview

INDEX
Note: ‘n. ’ after a page reference indicates the number of a note on that page.
abstract nouns 66, 70, 72, 73
accents, Irish 12
accomplishment perfect see medial-object perfect
activities, expressions involving -ing form of verbs 62, 66-7, 70, 71, 72
Adams, G. B. 69
adstratal influences 24, 277-8 :
definite article, nonstandard usages of 76
after perfect (AFP) 90, 99-107, 129
age-grading 273
Ahlqvist, A. 259
ailments 59-60, 66, 69, 70, 71, 73, 74
all58, 74
American Black English 173
American English (AmE):
indefinite anterior perfect 95, 97, 98;
medialobject perfect 111, 112;
subordinating and203;
word order in indirect questions 173
anaphors 78-9 :
see also reflexive pronouns
and, subordinating 196, 208 :
early HE texts and HE corpus 200-2;
Irish 198-200;
parallels in other varieties and earlier English 202-8;
previous studies 197-8;
structural types and meanings 196-7
Anderson, L. 103
Anglicisation:
Hebrides 50;
Ireland 50;
Wales 51-2
animal names 58
An t-Alt67
antecedents 78-9
Antrim, County 8
Appalachian English (AppE) 152, 157, 173
archaic construction of present perfect tense see medial-object perfect
areal linguistics 25
Armagh, County 8
Arran, Lord of 45
aspect 89, 90
Atlantic creoles 270
attributive clefts 244
attributive of238-41
Avalon peninsula, Newfoundland 52
Bähr, D. 225
Balkanisms 24
Ballinskelligs 40
Banim, John 47, 105, 111
Bargy 6
Barnes, W. 147
Bartley, J. O. 103
Beal, J. 153, 170, 182, 194
Belfast English:
subject-verb concord 152157;
universals 27;
word order in indirect questions 168, 178, 276
believe89
belong89
be perfect (BEP) 90, 116-22, 130
Bickerton, D. 16, 173, 270
bilingualism:
contact vernacular, HE as 1517, 279;
Irish standard of English 19;
language shift 31, 32, 280-1;
modern Ireland 8, 10
Bliss, A. J.:
after perfect 102-3;
be perfect 119, 120-1;
clefting 250, 255;
definite article, nonstandard usages 65, 69;
distinctiveness of HE 13;
extended-now perfect 125;
in228, 230;
indefinite anterior perfect 98;
Irish standard of English 17-18, 20, 21;
manuscript sources 42, 44;
medial-object perfect 110-11;
medieval Ireland 4, 5-6;

-322-

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The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables x
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The English Language in Ireland 4
  • 3 - Major Issues in the Study of Hiberno-English 12
  • 4 - Databases and Methods 36
  • 5 - The Noun Phrase 55
  • 6 - The Verb Phrase 89
  • 7 - Questions, Responses, and Negation 160
  • 8 - The Complex Sentence 184
  • 9 - Prepositional Usage 218
  • 10 - Focusing Devices 242
  • 11 - Discussion and Conclusions 271
  • Notes 299
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 322
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