The State and Ethnic Politics in Southeast Asia

By David Brown | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

The ethnocratic state and ethnic separatism in Burma

There are several cases of ethnic-separatist rebellion in Southeast Asia. 1 Each has its own distinct origins, grievances and goals, but the aim here is to examine one theme which recurs in most discussions of ethnic rebellion: the argument that the cause of such movements is the domination of the state by the ethnic majority community. 2

Burma offers a useful case for the study of ethnic rebellions. The cultural and linguistic structure of Burmese society is complex, but the majority-minority dimension is clear. The majority linguistic group are the Burmans, 3 who comprise about twothirds of the total population and who have traditionally inhabited the central Irrawaddy plain. The largest minority groups are the Shan, Kachin, Chin and Karen. 4 The earliest of the rebellions involved communist and separatist unrest amongst the Arakanese, in the western Irrawady plain. The conflict between Karen and Burman armed forces began in 1949 and stimulated similar outbreaks amongst Karenni, Mon and Pao groups. By the late 1950s, the further expansion of state intervention had precipitated separatist rebellions amongst the Kachin and the Shan. Since then, virtually all of the minority linguistic groups in Burma has been involved, at one time or another, in insurgency against the state. While some of this dissidence has taken a communist direction, ethnic disaffection has remained a central factor. 5 Some of the movements have demanded outright secession, though most would apparently now settle for some form of autonomy within a federal Burma, but repeated attempts at negotiation have failed.

The confrontational and protracted nature of the disputes can be traced in part to military stalemate, but there is also a

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The State and Ethnic Politics in Southeast Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.