Black American Prose Writers: Before the Harlem Renaissance

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview

User's Guide

THIS VOLUME PROVIDES biographical, critical, and bibliographical information on the thirteen most significant black American prose writers before the Harlem Renaissance. Each chapter consists of three parts: a biography of the author; a selection of brief critical extracts about the author; and a bibliography of the author's published books.

The biography supplies a detailed outline of the important events in the author's life, including his or her major writings. The critical extracts are taken from a wide array of books and periodicals, from the author's lifetime to the present, and range in content from biographical to critical to historical. The extracts are arranged in chronological order by date of writing or publication, and a full bibliographical citation is provided at the end of each extract. Editorial additions or deletions are indicated within carets.

The author bibliographies list every separate publication—including books, pamphlets, broadsides, collaborations, and works edited or translated by the author— for works published in the author's lifetime; selected important posthumous publications are also listed. Titles are those of the first edition; if a work has subsequently come to be known under a variant title, this title is supplied within carets. In selected instances dates of revised editions are given where these are significant. Pseudonymous works are listed but not the pseudonyms under which these works were published. Periodicals edited by the author are listed only when the author has written most or all of the contents. For plays we have listed date of publication, not date of production; unpublished plays are not listed. Titles enclosed in square brackets are of doubtful authenticity. All works by the author, whether in English or in other languages, have been listed; English translations of foreign-language works are not listed unless the author has done the translation.

-vi-

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Black American Prose Writers: Before the Harlem Renaissance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Black American Prose Writers - Before the Harlem Renaissance *
  • Contents *
  • User's Guide vi
  • The Life of the Author vii
  • Introduction xi
  • William Stanley Braithwaite 1878-1962 1
  • William Wells Brown C. 1814-1884 10
  • Charles W. Chesnutt 1858-1932 21
  • Martin R. Delany 1812-1885 35
  • Frederick Douglass 1818-1895 49
  • W. E. B. Du Bois 1868-1963 62
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar 1872-1906 78
  • Sutton E. Griggs 1872-1930 90
  • Pauline E. Hopkins 1859-1930 103
  • James Weldon Johnson 1871-1938 115
  • Oscar Micheaux 1884-1951 129
  • Frank J. Webb C. 1830-C. 1870 140
  • Harriet E. Wilson C. 1828-C. 1863 150
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