Choosing Unsafe Sex: AIDS-Risk Denial among Disadvantaged Women

By Elisa J. Sobo | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
The Psychosocial Benefits of Unsafe Sex

This chapter uses study findings to show that unsafe sex is part of a psychosocial strategy for maintaining one's status and sense of self -- a strategy that involves telling patterned narratives (as regarding a partner's faithfulness) and acting out scripts (as by engaging in unsafe sex) that optimistically confirm the quality of one's choice of a partner and so of one's relationship with him. Economic motives do, in some cases, play a role in encouraging some women's unsafe sex (e.g., Campbell 1990; Ward 1993a; Worth 1989) but, as Chapter 6 showed, purely materialist or economic approaches to urban minority women's risk-taking are inadequate (cf. Kline et al. 1992).

Such approaches ascribe the sex-related profit seeking motivations of many inner-city prostitutes or sex workers to all inner-city minority women, despite the fact that sex workers comprise only a small portion of inner-city female populations. Moreover, they disregard women's own testimony about their self-sufficiency, the high rate of unemployment among inner-city men of color, and the fact that inner-city men can and do seek and receive money from girlfriends ( Weinberg and Williams 1988; Liebow 1967). In addition to these flaws, materialist models of inner-city heterosexual coupling may be further diminished by the relative sizes of condom using and non-using women's paychecks (these were bigger, on average, for non-users in this study), and the relative amounts of money that users and non-users receive from men (these were lower, on average, for non-users). Findings from this research suggest that emotional and sociocultural factors are more important determinants of most Black inner-city women's condom use decisions than financial considerations are.

The connotations of condoms, which implicate users as philanderers and carriers of disease, need not be confronted if condoms are not used.

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Choosing Unsafe Sex: AIDS-Risk Denial among Disadvantaged Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.