Perspectives on the Yi of Southwest China

By Stevan Harrell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Homicide and Homicide Cases
in Old Liangshan
Qubi Shimei and Ma Erzi

Everybody who has done research on Yi society knows that in old Liangshan there was no organization holding coercive power and no military, police, courts, or jails to enforce social control, but nevertheless members of the whole society both strictly preserved internal social order and maintained social control in an orderly manner. What methods were used to effectively control social order and preserve it for hundreds or thousands of years? Few articles have discussed or investigated social control in Liangshan before the Democratic Reforms, and most of them have looked at this question from the standpoint of classes and social strata. Furthermore, although some of these articles have mentioned clan customary law, most have treated the issue only superficially.

This essay will examine customary laws used to settle cases of homicide within the patrilineal clan, along with a few case histories, in order to explain the stabilizing function of such customary laws in old Liangshan Yi society.


INTERNAL CLAN HOMICIDE CASES

Nuosu call homicide coquo, which means “smashing a person. ” Customary law defined a whole set of rules for settling homicide cases, which in Nuohxo are called coquo dijie, meaning “laws for settling homicide cases. ” These can be divided according to kinship relations into laws that settle cases of killing a clan mate, an affine, a woman, a maternal nephew, a husband or wife, or a nonrelative. According to occupation, they can be divided into laws that settle cases of killing a ndeggu (mediator), a bimo (priest), or a jjojjo (ordinary person). Homicide laws can also be divided according to social stratum into those that govern cases of killing an nzymo, a nuoho, a quho, a mgajie, or a

-94-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Perspectives on the Yi of Southwest China
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 321

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.