Colored White: Transcending the Racial Past

By David R. Roediger | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1
All citations here and in nn. 2, 3, and 4 below are in Time 142 (Fall 1993), a special issue not in weekly sequence. On the “universal nation” and “open door, ” see Editors, “America's Immigrant Challenge, ” 3, quoting Ben J. Wattenberg; Pico Tyer, “The Global Village Finally Arrives, ” 87, quoting Federico Mayor Zaragoza on “superpower”; Cathy Booth, “The Capital of Latin America: Miami, ” 82; Robert Eaton in Chrysler advertisement at 13. On “special issues” of popular magazines, nativism, and gender, see Lauren Berlant, The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship (Durham: Duke University Press, 1997), 196.
2
Tyer, “Global Village, ” 87; James Walsh, “The Perils of Success, ” 55; Bruce W. Nelan, “Not Quite So Welcome Anymore, ” 10–13; Michael Walsh, “The Shadow of the Law, ” 17; Richard Brookhiser, “Three Cheers for the WASPs, ” 78–79; Editors, “America's Immigrant Challenge, ” 6. On efforts to end “birthright citizenship” in the United States in the 1990s, see Dorothy E. Roberts, “Who May Give Birth to Citizens: Reproduction, Eugenics, and Immigration, ” in Juan F. Perea's important collection Immigrants Out! The New Nativism and the Anti-Immigrant Impulse in the United States (New York: New York University Press, 1997), 208 and 205–19 passim.
3
“Rebirth of a Nation, Computer-Style, ” 66; James Gaines, “From the Managing Editor, ” 2; Jill Smolowe, “Intermarried …With Children, ” 64–65.
4
Front cover, Editors, “America's Immigrant Challenge, ” 5; “Rebirth of the Nation, ” 66. On The Birth of a Nation, see Michael Rogin, “'The Sword Became a Flashing Vision': D. W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation, ” in Robert Lang, ed., The Birth of a Nation (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1994), 250–93; Toni Morrison, “On the Backs of Blacks, ” 57; William A. Henry III, “The Politics of Separation, ” 73–74. For Michael Rogin, see his

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