Colored White: Transcending the Racial Past

By David R. Roediger | Go to book overview

Index
Aaron, Charles, 226
Abdul-Jabbar, Kareem, 74, 86
abolitionists: Frederick Douglass, 105–120; on free blacks, 106; John Brown, 97–102; labor as issue of, 104; on labor reform, 119–120; wageslavery metaphor, 105–114; on white slavery, 108–114; on women's rights, 104–105, 114–119
abortion, 38–39
Abu-Jamal, Mumia, 16, 203–209
Adams, Larry, 206
Adamson, Joe, 231
Addams, Jane, 148
Ades, Dawn, 174
advertising: black images, 52, 71–72, 83, 150; and O. J. Simpson, 71–72, 76–77, 90
affirmative action: and Clinton/New Democrats, 55–56; as non-race specific initiative, 60; South Africa, 56–57
African Americans: and John Brown, 97–102, and labor, 152–156; and labor unions, 161–162, 182–202; mixing of races and pure population, 9–10; money spending habits, 155; and new immigrants, 166; in prison population, 12
Against Race: Imagining Political Culture Beyond the Color Line (Gilroy), 13–14
Aid to Families with Dependent Children, racial stigmatization, 60
Alcindor, Lew. See Abdul-Jabbar, Kareem
Ali, Muhammad, 40, 73, 82–83
Allen, Theodore, 23, 121, 131, 137
Almaguer, Tomás, 20, 132, 187
Amado, Jorge, 33
American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), 107
American Federation of Labor (AFL), 65; and new-immigrant labor, 156–163
American Federation of Labor Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO): on colorblind policy, 181; on immigrant workers, 210; Sweeney Time, 207–211
American Legion, 162
America's Forgotten Majority: Why the White Working Class Still Matters (Teixeira and Rogers), 61
Anders, Richard, 176
Ansari, Zaid, 230
Anthony, Susan B., 115
Anzaldúa, Gloria, 20, 23
apartheid, American-style, 11
Aptheker, Herbert, 97
Arledge, Roone, 86–88
Arnesen, Eric, 191
Aronowitz, Stanley, 207
Asian Indian crossovers, 238–239
athletes: great black athletes, 71, 73–74, 77–78, 82–83, 86, 89. See also Simpson, O. J.
Atwater, Lee, 233–234
Axton, Mae, 221
Bacon, David, 210
Baldwin, James, 20, 22, 27, 34, 99, 240
Banks, Russell, 98–99

-315-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Colored White: Transcending the Racial Past
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 323

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.