Biodiversity Conservation in Costa Rica: Learning the Lessons in a Seasonal Dry Forest

By Gordon W. Frankie; Alfonso Mata et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
Diversity, Migration, and Conservation of
Butterflies in Northern Costa Rica
William A. Haber and Robert D. Stevenson

MIGRATION CAN BE simply defined as a sustained, directional movement by an animal that takes it out of one habitat and into another (Dingle 1996), and this is the definition used here. It distinguishes migrating behavior from local movements within an animal's home range that tend to be nonlinear, of short duration, and confined to a single habitat (Dingle 1996). Seasonal migration typically involves a two-way trip between habitats, exemplified by the annual back-and-forth flights of Neotropical migrant songbirds between the North Temperate Zone and the tropics (Levey 1994; Martin and Finch 1995). Two-way migration by individual butterflies occurs in some longer-lived species such as the monarch in North America (Brower 1991, 1996) and the common Costa Rican migrant Manataria maculata (Satyrinae; Stevenson and Haber 2000a). However, the migration of most insects, relatively short-lived compared with vertebrates, is a one-way trip for a given individual, and members of a succeeding generation make the return trip (Haber 1993; Dingle 1996; chapter 7).

Migration behavior has been recognized in butterflies for centuries (Williams 1930; Johnson 1969; Baker 1978; Dingle 1996), although it has been studied in detail for only a few species, such as the monarch (Danaus plexippus) (Brower 1991, 1996) and the painted lady (Vanessa cardui) (Hansen 1997). Among butterflies, migrating individuals are generally easy to distinguish from nonmigrants. Migrants fly in a relatively straight line, usually 1–2 m above the ground, and rise over objects in their path, such as houses or forest patches, rather than flying around them. In contrast, active butterflies that are not migrating fly a crooked route, alighting often to bask or feed. Females stop frequently to check potential host plants, and males perch to watch for passing females. Their directed flights rarely take them more than 20 to 30 m in a given direction.

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biodiversity Conservation in Costa Rica: Learning the Lessons in a Seasonal Dry Forest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.