The Legacy of Nazi Occupation: Patriotic Memory and National Recovery in Western Europe, 1945-1965

By Pieter Lagrou | Go to book overview

5
The challenge to the post-war state: Belgium
and the Netherlands

The sheer scale of the repatriation, its implications for social conditions in the economic reconstruction and its repercussions on the self-image of nations humiliated by an exodus that they had been unable to prevent turned it into a central political challenge. It constituted a test case for the post-war regimes their organisational abilities, their efficiency and their inventiveness. It enabled governments that promised and projected a new welfare state, that studied Beveridge and domestic variants of plans for social security, to demonstrate the capacity of the state to take care of great numbers of destitute citizens. It magnified the problems of rationing and distribution. It presented the opportunity to experiment extensively with new technologies, most often put at their disposal by the Allies, in matters as varied as disease prevention (DDT, first used on a large scale by the Allies during the typhus epidemic in Naples in 1943) or transport (the air transport of ordinary citizens from Germany had a most spectacular effect, which repatriation officials were quick to exploit through a careful mise en scène).

It also created huge opportunities for political recruitment. The repatriates were politically virgin, cut off from political developments in their homeland since their departure 1940 for the French prisoners of war, many of whom still lingered in the mental atmosphere of the first months of the Vichy regime at the time of their return; 1943–4 for most labour conscripts. They were unfamiliar with the emergence of a large resistance movement and massive public adherence to the Allied cause and to the governments-in-exile that took place after they left for Germany. They had lived in relative political isolation, whatever the claims by resistance movements of all kinds as to the influence of their propaganda amongst their fellow citizens in Germany. In any case, after the Allied landing and the ensuing liberation of France, Belgium and part of the Netherlands, their isolation was complete and they were cut off from the tumultuous start of post-war political life in their countries. Every repatriate moreover represented a whole string of relatives, neighbours, colleagues and friends, whose political sympathies might be

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Legacy of Nazi Occupation: Patriotic Memory and National Recovery in Western Europe, 1945-1965
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 327

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.