Turbulent Decade: A History of the Cultural Revolution

By Yan Jiaqi; Gao Gao et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 29

The Tiananmen Square
Incident [1976]

The Death of Zhou Enlai

The publication of "The Direction of the Educational Revolution Cannot Be Altered" brought manifest changes in China's political atmosphere. Mao Zedong put criticism of Deng Xiaoping on the agenda.

Zhou Enlai in his capacity as premier strongly supported Deng Xiaoping's work in rectifying the losses of the Cultural Revolution. His physical ability to play a role fell short of his wishes as a result of his undergoing six major and eight minor operations. While Zhou Enlai was hospitalized, Jiang Qing and company often went intentionally to interfere in his treatment. Deng Yingchao often asked them tearfully to let her husband rest. But her request was ignored. The Gang of Four gossiped to Mao Zedong that "the premier only pretended to be ill, and was actually using illness as an excuse to connive with those old fellows." They made trouble for Zhou Enlai even as he lay in his sickbed.

One day they questioned Zhou on his whereabouts on April 12, 1927, when the coup took place. Another day, when Zhou was receiving a blood transfusion and had just fallen asleep, Wang Hongwen called and asked to talk to him. When the nurses explained the situation and asked him to wait half an hour, Wang flew into a rage and insisted Zhou answer the telephone at once. Zhou was awakened by the noise and had to ask the nurse to stop the transfusion in order to talk to Wang. Jiang Qing caused even more troubles for Zhou. One day she called Zhou to say she had to see him on business. The nurses were forced to stop their treatment of Zhou. But when Jiang came, she chattered on every subject but business. She finally left after having consumed two pieces of watermelon. 1 Such instances were numerous.

In September 1975, Zhou's condition deteriorated rapidly, his weight dropping from 65 kilograms to about 40 kilograms. He was so weak that he could

-482-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Turbulent Decade: A History of the Cultural Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 659

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.