Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: Empirical Contributions

By Georges-Franck Pinard; Linda Pagani | Go to book overview

Prologue
PAUL S. APPELBAUM

Interpersonal violence is an inescapable reality of contemporary society. Pick up any newspaper or listen to any news broadcast and witness the litany of violence it reveals. Murder, sexual assault, child abuse, hate crimes, terrorism – the list seems endless, the details numbingly familiar, until the day's stories blend into yesterday's, and those into the accounts of last week and the week before.

Only a fraction of this violence, of course, comes to clinical attention and that is either because the victims seek assistance or, more pertinent to the focus of this volume, because the perpetrators believe themselves or are believed by others to have a mental disorder. Indeed, although persons with mental disorders account for a small proportion of violence in most societies, the public, stoked by the media, are disproportionately concerned about the risks posed by this group. A recent estimate in the United States put percentage of violent acts accounted for by the mentally ill at about three percent, (Swanson, 1994) and data from England suggest that the proportion of murders attributable to persons with mental illness has actually been falling over time. (Taylor & Gunn, 1999) But popular estimates of the proportion of psychiatric patients who are likely to commit violent crimes vastly exceed the actual number (Pescosolido, Monahan, Link, Stueve, & Kikuzawa, 1999).

The simultaneous fascination with and terror of violence committed by persons with mental disorders was illustrated graphically quite recently in the pages of a major newspaper. There at the front of the local news section, positioned precisely in the middle of the page, was a lengthy story describing a murder committed by a man whom the headline advertised as a “mental patient. ” His life, the crime itself, and the events leading up to it were all laid out in stark detail, in this article

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: Empirical Contributions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Prologue ix
  • References xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: an Overview of the Literature *
  • References *
  • Basic Issues in Violence Research 23
  • 2 - Biology, Development, and Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • 3 - The Development of Physical Aggression During Childhood and the Prediction of Later Dangerousness 47
  • References *
  • 4 - Predicting Adult Official and Self-Reported Violence 66
  • References *
  • Mental Health Issues and Dangerousness 89
  • 5 - Major Mental Disorder and Violence: Epidemiology and Risk Assessment *
  • References 100
  • 6 - Axis II Disorders and Dangerousness 103
  • References *
  • 7 - Recidivistic Violent Behavior and Axis I and Axis II Disorders 121
  • References *
  • Family Issues and Dangerousness 136
  • 8 - Risk Assessment for Intimate Partner Homicide *
  • References *
  • 9 - Parents at Risk of Filicide 158
  • References *
  • 10 - Parricide 181
  • References 194
  • Individual Characteristics and Dangerousness 195
  • 11 - Alcohol and Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • 12 - Violence and Substance Abuse 216
  • References *
  • 13 - Threats, Stalking, and Criminal Harassment 238
  • References *
  • Conclusion 258
  • 14 - Discussion and Clinical Commentary on Issues in the Assessment and Prediction of Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • Index 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.