Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: Empirical Contributions

By Georges-Franck Pinard; Linda Pagani | Go to book overview

3
The Development of Physical Aggression
During Childhood and the Prediction of Later
Dangerousness
RICHARD E. TREMBLAY

When Does Violent Behavior Start?

The Adolescent Years

Using data on the prevalence of serious violent crimes from the American National Youth Survey, Elliott (1994) reported that black and white adolescent males and females in the United States became more and more at risk of committing serious violent crimes as they grew older, from 12 to 17 years of age. This sharp increase of violence was then followed, from ages 18 to 27, by an equally dramatic fall in the prevalence of serious violence. Violence appeared to peak at 17 years of age for both black and white adolescents in this national probability sample born between 1959 and 1965. This phenomenon has been labeled the age-crime curve (Farrington, 1987) and appears to have first been published by the Belgian astronomer-statistician-criminologist Adolfe Quetelet in his 1833 book entitled Research on the Propensity for Crime at Different Ages.

The author wishes to acknowledge the generous support of the National Science Foundation through the National Consortium on Violence Research, the Molson Foundation, the Donner Foundation, the Canadian Institute of Advanced Research, the Québec funding agencies CQRS, FCAR, FRSQ, the Québec Ministry of Health and Social Services, Santé Québec, the Canadian funding agencies NHRDP, SSHRC, the Canadian Ministry of Human Resources Development, and Statistics Canada. A large number of colleagues have contributed to the work presented in this chapter. Special thanks go to Daniel Nagin, Frank Vitaro, Michel Boivin, Mark Zoccolillo, Raymond Baillargeon, Lisa Broidy, Christa Japel, Daniel Pérusse, Jean Séguin, Robert Pihl, Linda Pagani, Jacques Montplaisir, and Ronald G. Barr. A still larger number of support personnel have been instrumental in making this longitudinal work possible. The author is especially grateful to Lyse Desmarais-Gervais, Hélène Beauchesne, Pierre McDuff, Chantal Bruneau, and Katia Maliantovitch.

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: Empirical Contributions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Prologue ix
  • References xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Clinical Assessment of Dangerousness: an Overview of the Literature *
  • References *
  • Basic Issues in Violence Research 23
  • 2 - Biology, Development, and Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • 3 - The Development of Physical Aggression During Childhood and the Prediction of Later Dangerousness 47
  • References *
  • 4 - Predicting Adult Official and Self-Reported Violence 66
  • References *
  • Mental Health Issues and Dangerousness 89
  • 5 - Major Mental Disorder and Violence: Epidemiology and Risk Assessment *
  • References 100
  • 6 - Axis II Disorders and Dangerousness 103
  • References *
  • 7 - Recidivistic Violent Behavior and Axis I and Axis II Disorders 121
  • References *
  • Family Issues and Dangerousness 136
  • 8 - Risk Assessment for Intimate Partner Homicide *
  • References *
  • 9 - Parents at Risk of Filicide 158
  • References *
  • 10 - Parricide 181
  • References 194
  • Individual Characteristics and Dangerousness 195
  • 11 - Alcohol and Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • 12 - Violence and Substance Abuse 216
  • References *
  • 13 - Threats, Stalking, and Criminal Harassment 238
  • References *
  • Conclusion 258
  • 14 - Discussion and Clinical Commentary on Issues in the Assessment and Prediction of Dangerousness *
  • References *
  • Index 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 286

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.