The Anti-Jacobin Novel: British Conservatism and the French Revolution

By M. O. Grenby | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
So reads the first sentence of what is still the standard survey of the fiction of the period, J. M. S. Tompkins' The Popular Novel in England 1770–1800 (London: Methuen, 1932), p. 1.
2
Amongst the best of this work has been: Marilyn Butler, Maria Edgeworth: A Literary Biography (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972) and Peacock Displayed: A Satirist in His Context (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979); Warren Roberts, Jane Austen and the French Revolution (London: Macmillan, 1979); P. D. Tripathi, The Doctrinal English Novel (Later Eighteenth Century). MiddleClass Consciousness in England During the American and French Revolutions (Calcutta: Bagchi, 1977); David Durant, 'Ann Radcliffe and the Conservative Gothic', Studies in English Literature 1500–1900, 22 (1982), 519–30; Mary Poovey, The Proper Lady and the Woman Writer. Ideology as Style in the Works of Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, and Jane Austen (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984); Ann H. Jones, Ideas and Innovations. Best-Sellers of Jane Austen's Age (New York: AMS Press, 1986); Mary Anne Schofield and Cecilia Macheski (eds.), Fetter'd or Free? British Women Novelists, 1670–1815 (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1986); Margaret Anne Doody, Frances Burney. The Life in the Works (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1988); Kelvin Everest (ed.), Revolution in Writing. British Literary Responses to the French Revolution (Milton Keynes: Open University Press, 1991); Chris Jones, Radical Sensibility. Literature and Ideas in the 1790s (London: Routledge, 1993); Gary Kelly, Women, Writing and Revolution 1790–1827 (Oxford: Oxford University Press: 1993); Mona Scheuermann, Her Bread to Earn. Women, Money, and Society from Defoe to Austen (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1993); Eleanor Ty, Unsex'd Revolutionaries. Five Women Novelists of the 1790s (University of Toronto Press, 1993); and Loraine Fletcher, Charlotte Smith. A Critical Biography (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998). A fuller bibliographical survey than is presented in this chapter has already appeared: M. O. Grenby, 'The Anti-Jacobin Novel: British Fiction, British Conservatism and the Revolution in France', History: the Journal of the Historical Association, 83 (July 1998), 445–71.
3
Gregory, The French Revolution and the English Novel (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1915), pp. 134–60; Tompkins, Popular Novel in England, pp. 296–328;

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