From Hitler's Doorstep: The Wartime Intelligence Reports of Allen Dulles, 1942-1945

By Neal H. Petersen; Allen Welsh Dulles | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

Following the end of hostilities in Europe, Dulles visited Italy in regard to the aftermath of Sunrise and sought in vain for remnants of the Ciano diaries. Press reports concerning Sunrise, some relatively accurate, began to appear within days. They were a matter of concern for Dulles and the OSS because they threatened to compromise Swiss sources and in one case gave undue credit to the British. Dulles and Gaevernitz completed their classified report on the operation on May 22.

On June 23, 1945, the OSS sent two similar, highly favorable reports summarizing the wartime activities of Dulles and OSS Bern -- one to President Truman and the other to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Commissioned by Donovan and based in part on testimony from Dulles, these reports were intended to portray the organization at its best in a period when it was fighting for its postwar institutional life. The reports are filed in Entry 99, Box 18.

Dulles expected to head an OSS German Unit going into occupied territory immediately but was required to remain in Switzerland until July, when he became head of the OSS mission in Germany. The reasons for the delay are unclear, but problems with the U.S. Army, the Red Army, or the OSS bureaucracy and General Donovan could have been involved. Robert Joyce took over day-to-day management of OSS Bern in early June. Dulles busied himself with loose ends and matters of intelligence transition to a peacetime footing. This included personnel questions concerning those who had served under him and were now leaving Switzerland, and the transferring or terminating of agents in such areas as northern Italy.

From May to August 1945, while Dulles remained in Bern and after he moved to Germany, a series of significant negotiations occurred in Switzerland involving

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