From Hitler's Doorstep: The Wartime Intelligence Reports of Allen Dulles, 1942-1945

By Neal H. Petersen; Allen Welsh Dulles | Go to book overview

Notes
[All citations to box numbers refer to containers in RG 226, Entry 134, unless otherwise indicated. The chronological arrangement of cable files permits document identification within boxes.]
Introduction
The Allen Dulles Papers at Princeton University constitute the most important source on his career before World War II. This material contains extensive information on his early life, education, diplomatic service, and law career with Sullivan & Cromwell. Letters and other personal papers document Dulles's accumulation of friends and contacts. State Department records at the National Archives (RG 59 and RG 84) contain some documents pertaining to his diplomatic service from 1916 to 1926 and to his service as an adviser in the 1930s. Regarding the Dulles family, see Eleanor Lansing Dulles, Chances of a Lifetime: A Memoir ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1980). Leonard Mosley Dulles: A Biography of Eleanor, Allen, and John Foster Dulles and their Family Network ( New York: Dial/Wade, 1978) is an important source but should be used with caution. A Law Unto Itself: The Untold Story of the Law Firm of Sullivan and Cromwell, by Nancy Lisagor and Frank Lipsius ( New York: Morrow, 1988), is revealing on the role of the Dulles brothers.
Chapter I: An Island in Occupied Europe, November 1942-August 1943
Doc. 1-1, Tel. 5098, Nov. 10, 1942, Box 307. Dulles's arrival in Switzerland is reported in Tel. 52 from Bern, Nov. 12, 1942 (Box 171). Dulles had a harrowing trip to his post via Lisbon and Barcelona, including a border encounter with the Gestapo. He saw his tasks in Bern as gathering information about the enemy and rendering support and encouragement to resistance forces in neighboring countries( Allen W. Dulles , The Secret Surrender [ New York: Harper & Row, 1966], chap. 2, "Mission in Switzerland"). Anthony Cave Brown also gives an overview of the Bern operation in The Last Hero: Wild Bill Donovan ( New York: Times Books, 1982), chap. 18, "The Dulles Organization." Brown's account is useful and provocative but not uniformly reliable. A similar treatment appears in Burton Hersh, The Old Boys: The American Elite and the Origins of the CIA ( New York: Scribners, 1992). Bradley Smith presents a brief but more balanced account in The Shadow Warriors: OSS and the Origins of the CIA ( New York: Basic Books, 1983). R. Harris Smith, OSS: The Secret History of America's First Central Intelligence Agency ( Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1972), is also helpfull.
Evidence of an OSS presence in Switzerland before the arrival of Dulles is found in cables in Boxes 171, 307, 339. These existing sources or channels are designated "Drum" and "Moffet." The designations "Schubert" and "Michael" also appear in telegrams of 1942 and early 1943. The office of the Military Attaché, Gen. Barnwell Legge, conducted intelligence operations before November 1942, as

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