Transnational Organized Crime and International Security: Business as Usual?

By Mats Berdal; Mónica Serrano | Go to book overview

9
Liberal Markets and the Republic of
Europe: Contextualizing the Growth
of Transnational Organized Crime
Ian Taylor

In June 2000, the bodies of fifty-eight Chinese illegal immigrants into

Britain were discovered in an airtight container at the Channel port of Dover. The find finally produced some public debate about transnational criminal involvement in illegal immigration into Britain. The debate encouraged some awareness of the kinds of issues that have been under active discussion since the turn of the century in most other European Union (EU) member states.

The responses to the incident were, however, entirely predictable. The first was to berate governments, especially national governments, for their failure to prevent such a tragedy. Although the EU has, since 1998, been involved in negotiations with African, Caribbean, and Pacific (ACP) countries on a new Lomé Convention, with a view to harmonizing approaches to the repatriation or expulsion of people “illegally present” within the EU, meetings in December 1999 failed to reach agreement on the procedures to be followed with respect to immigrants for whom no EU or ACP country was prepared to accept responsibility (Statewatch 2000, pp. 1–3; see Chapter 6). This failure surfaced in many press reports in Britain as one of the factors contributing to the growth of illegal immigration into and across the EU (Burke et al. 2000). By implication, the failure of governments, both at the national and at the European level, to agree on fast-track measures to repatriate illegal immigrants is seen as the fundamental reason why immigrants continue to flow across national boundaries into and within Europe, in spite of the heroic efforts of police and customs officials to stop them.

The second response was to explain the event as resulting from the activities of a conspiratorial group of organized criminals from abroad. In this instance, the group identified was the “Snakeheads, based in Guangdong, Fujian, and Zhejiang provinces in southern China, the areas

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Transnational Organized Crime and International Security: Business as Usual?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 243

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.