Civilizing Capitalism: The National Consumers' League, Women's Activism, and Labor Standards in the New Deal Era

By Landon R. Y. Storrs | Go to book overview

acknowledgments

I am indebted to numerous people and institutions for their assistance on this project. For financial support over the years, I thank the Mellon Fellowships in the Humanities program, the University of Wisconsin Graduate School, the Polly Rousmaniere Gordon Fund, and the University of Houston Research Initiation Grant, Limited-Grant-in-Aid, and publication subvention programs.

The story told in these pages required research on widely scattered local developments as well as national ones. The resourcefulness of many archivists around the country was indispensable to completing this research. I thank in particular the staff at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College, the Labor-Management Documentation Center at Cornell University, and the Library of Congress, as well as Tab Lewis and Fred Romanski at the National Archives. Archivists who offered valuable assistance from afar include Kathleen Nutter at the Smith College Library, Betsy Pittman at the Virginia Commonwealth University Library, Claire McCann at the University of Kentucky Library, and Kathie Johnson at the University of Louisville Library. I also thank the interlibrary loan staff at the University of Houston. During the difficult process of locating suitable illustrations, several people came through in a pinch, including Mary Ternes at the District of Columbia Public Library, the staff of the Prints and Photographs Room at the Library of Congress, and, above all, my mother, Landon T. Storrs, who was an extraordinarily quick study as my East Coast research surrogate.

Several fortuitous coincidences enriched the experience of researching this book. After I decided to study the history of women-only labor laws in the 1930s, I learned that the lead organization backing such laws was headed in those years by my mother's great-aunt, Lucy Randolph Mason. A central figure in this study, Mason died before I was born, and surviving relatives know very little about her. My kinship to Mason did not yield any research advantages, but it improved my work by making me strive for high standards of scholarly detachment. In a second coincidence, a suggestion from my paternal grandmother Frances R. Storrs led me to her cous

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