Civilizing Capitalism: The National Consumers' League, Women's Activism, and Labor Standards in the New Deal Era

By Landon R. Y. Storrs | Go to book overview

appendix 1

National Consumers' League
Officers, 1933 and 1941

Italicized names indicate those who were officers in both 1933 and 1941. All board members were elected to two-year terms. After Florence Kelley died, the national league was reorganized to create a more active board. One change was to make room for more board members by making branch league presidents ex officio members with the right to vote. The council met annually.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS, 1933
John R. Commons, President
Nicholas Kelley, Chair
Lucy R. Mason, General Secretary
Emily S. Marconnier, Assoc. General
Secretary
Hyman Schroeder, Treasurer
Beulah Amidon
Myrta Jones Cannon

Mary W. Dewson
Grace Drake
Mary Childs Draper
Pauline Goldmark
Florina Lasker
John H. Lathrop

Mrs. E. V. Mitchell
George S. Mitchell
Lucy P. Pollak
Florence Canfield Whitney
Leo Wolman

COUNCIL, 1933
Edith Abbott, University of Chicago
Mrs. A. A. Berle Jr., New York

BOARD OF DIRECTORS, 1941
Josephine Roche, President
Paul F. Brissenden, Chair
Mary Dublin, General Secretary
Hyman Schroeder, Treasurer
Beulah Amidon
Elizabeth Brown
Arthur R. Burns
Myrta Jones Cannon
James Carey
William H. Davis
Pauline Goldmark
Nicholas Kelley
Florina Lasker
John H. Lathrop
Lois MacDonald

Louise Leonard McLaren
Lucy P. Pollak
Robert F. Wagner Jr.

COUNCIL, 1941
Edith Abbott
Alfred Bettman, Cincinnati

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