Postmodernism and the Postsocialist Condition: Politicized Art under Late Socialism

By Aleš Erjavec | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Numerous people helped in getting this book off the ground, supplied nformation, publications, contacts, names, ideas, and criticism. Let me acknowledge with gratitude at least some of those without whom it could not have come into being: Lars-Olof Åhlberg, Gábor Bachman, Imre Bak, Geremie Barmé, László Beke, Ákos Birkás, Tony Cascardi, Paul Crowther, Dubravka DjuriÉ, Grzegorz Dziamski, Andrzej Ekwinski, Cola Franzen, Bora Gabor, Marina Gržinić, Lóránd Hegyi, Ludvik Hlaváček, Maria Hlávajova, Hanru Hou, Martin Jay, Anna Kiss, Noémi Kiss, želimir KošÉeviÉ, Attila Kovács, Lev Kreft, Ada KrnačováGutleber, Eva Kit Wah Man, Raffaele Milani, Miran Mohar, Stefan Morawski, Suzanne Mőszely, Katalin Néray, Heinz Paetzold, Darko Pokorn, the editors of Poliester , Paul Reitter, Judith Sárodsy, Margarita Schultz, Marketta Seppälä, Jiři ševčík, Roman Uranjek, Mark Valentine, Rachel Weiss, Ernest ženko, and Paula Zupanc-Ecimovic. Substantial help and support were offered by the Scientific Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts and its director, Oto Luthar. A part of the research for this book was carried out with the support of the Higher Education Support Scheme, which is hereby gratefully acknowledged. I also feel indebted to Deborah Kirshman, the editor for fine arts at the University of California Press, and her assistant, Jennie Sutton, to Stephanie Fay, and to copyeditor Bud Bynack.

ALEš ERJAVEC
Ljubljana, August 25, 2000

-xiii-

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