Postmodernism and the Postsocialist Condition: Politicized Art under Late Socialism

By Aleš Erjavec | Go to book overview

Post-Utopian
Avant-Garde Art in China
Gao Minglu

There are undoubtedly many common features shared by the former socialist countries, including China, with the notions of postsocialism and postmodernism representing double faces of the predominant political and economic circumstances of these environments. I wish to discuss the significance of these two notions in relation to Chinese contemporary art.

The question may well be posed: How can the notion of postmodernism be used as a broad universal “ism” to generalize the contemporary art of the 1980s in China, a typical Third World country with a long and distinct cultural tradition in which a modernist culture similar to that of the West has never existed? The answer is that the lack of Western modernist tradition is precisely why, in the China of the 1980s, we find a mixture of both modernism and postmodernism, understood according to their original Western definitions. Postmodernism in the 1980s in China did not play a dominant role , nor was postmodernism a period in the sense that it fit into the logic of temporal succession. Rather, it was a superficial consciousness of a new cultural criticism that promotes an iconoclastic attitude and certain pragmatic cultural strategies.

To put it another way:Two absences characterize Chinese modern cultural history. One is the absence of a clear idea of a temporal succession in which modernism is followed by postmodernism, as is the case in the West. For the Chinese, modernism and postmodernism have not involved a consciousness of global historical epochs or of a global philosophy of history, but have been a matter of individual subjectivity within a cultural environment possessing a strong sense of nationalism. For the Chinese, being modern equaled a new notion of the nation, rather than a new epoch, 1 and post

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Postmodernism and the Postsocialist Condition: Politicized Art under Late Socialism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vi
  • Illustrations vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Foreword xv
  • Notes xviii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 50
  • The Other Gaze - Russian Unofficial Art's View of the Soviet World 55
  • Notes *
  • Art as a Political Machine - Fragments on the Late Socialist and Postsocialist Art of Mitteleuropa and the Balkans 90
  • Notes *
  • Neue Slowenische Kunst—new Slovenian Art - Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Self-Management, and the 1980s 135
  • Notes *
  • Hungarian Marginal Art in the Late Period of State Socialism 175
  • Notes *
  • The New Cuban Art 208
  • Notes *
  • Post-Utopian Avant-Garde Art in China 247
  • Notes *
  • Contributors 285
  • Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 297

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.