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Postmodernism and the Postsocialist Condition: Politicized Art under Late Socialism

By Aleš Erjavec | Go to book overview

Contributors

Aleš Erjavec is research director at the Institute of Philosophy of the Scientific Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts and professor of aesthetics at the University of Ljubljana. His books include On Aesthetics, Art, and Ideology (Ljubljana, 1983), Aesthetics and Epistemology (Ljubljana, 1984), Art and Ideology of Modernism (Ljubljana, 1988; Sarajevo, 1991), Ljubljana, Ljubljana: The Eighties in Slovene Art and Culture (also in English, with Marina Gržinić; Ljubljana, 1991), Aesthetics and Critical Theory (Ljubljana, 1995), and Towards the Image (Ljubljana, 1996; Jilin, 2003).

Boris Groys was born in East Berlin, studied philosophy and mathematics in St. Petersburg, and worked as a research fellow at various research institutes in Moscow. In 1981, he emigrated to the Federal Republic of Germany. He is currently professor of aesthetics and media theory at the Center for Art and Media Technology in Karlsruhe. His books include Gesamtkunstwerk Stalin (Munich, 1988; published in English as The Total Art of Stalinism, Princeton, 1992), Die Kunst des Fliehens (with Ilya Kabakov; Munich, 1991), Über das Neue (Munich, 1992), Logik der Sammlung (Munich, 1997), Unter Verdacht: Eine Phänomenologie der Medien (Munich, 2000).

Misko Šuvaković is professor of aesthetics and art history in the Faculty of Music of the University of Arts, Belgrade. His books include Pas Tout: Fragments on Art, Culture, Politics, Poetics, and Art Theory (Buffalo, 1994), A Prolegomenon for Analytical Aesthetics (Novi Sad, 1995), The Post-Modern (Belgrade, 1995), Asymmetrical Other (Belgrade, 1996), Neša Paripović: SelfPortraits (Belgrade, 1996), Aesthetics of Abstract Painting (Belgrade, 1998), and Vocabulary of Modern and Postmodern Visual Art and Theory after 1950 (Belgrade and Novi Sad, 1999). He is the coeditor (with Dubravka Djurić) of Impossible Histories: Avant-Garde, Neo-Avant-Garde, and Post-AvantGarde in Yugoslavia, 1918–1991 (Cambridge, Mass., 2003).

Péter György is associate professor in the Department of Aesthetics and Communication, ELTE University, Budapest. He is the author of The European School (with Gábor Pataki, Budapest, 1989), The Sunken Island (Budapest, 1992), Art and Society in the Age of Stalin (also in English and German, Budapest, 1992), The City of Copies (Budapest, 1993), Letter to the

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