Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953

By Yoram Gorlizki; Oleg Khlevniuk | Go to book overview

1
A RETURN TO ORDER

T he everyday pressures on Joseph Stalin during the Second World War surpassed even the most grueling experiences of the 1930s. Serving in no fewer than five leadership roles, Stalin had no choice but to delegate full responsibility over certain spheres of government and the economy to his colleagues. 1 These leaders, and especially those who doubled up as members of the supreme civilian authority, the State Defense Committee (GKO), were given plenipotentiary powers to cut through red tape and to achieve military-economic targets on their own steam. 2 By the war's end Stalin's deputies had come to enjoy a measure of freedom in their respective fields and to resemble more the semiautonomous leaders of the early 1930s than the cowed and submissive Politburo minions of the first post-purge years. To add to the greater independence of the ruling circle, the accumulated pressures of war had taken their toll on Stalin's health and stamina. Shortly after the war, in October 1945, Stalin went on a long sojourn to the south, his first in almost ten years. According to some reports, the ruler had retired from the capital in order to convalesce from a heart attack that had struck over the summer; Western newspapers even ran a story that, after almost twenty years at the helm, Stalin had voluntarily opted to step down from the rigors of leading what had become one of the most powerful states in the world. 3

That the latter reports proved to be completely groundless did not mean that Stalin could afford to ignore the major changes, both within the ruling circle and in his own appetite for work, resulting from the war. Stalin's response to this state of affairs would prove to be typically robust. First, within the space of little more than a year, he carried out a series of savage personal attacks on each member of his inner circle. Designed to resurrect

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents *
  • Cold Peace *
  • Introduction 3
  • Part I - Reconstruction 15
  • 1 - A Return to Order 17
  • 2 - State Building Stalin Stale 45
  • Part II - Stalin's Shift 67
  • 3 - The Politburo's Last Purge 69
  • 4 - Peaceful Coexistence: Collective Leadership and Stalinist Control 97
  • Part III - Stalin's Legacy 121
  • 5 - Awakening to Crisis 123
  • 6 - Stalin's Last Struggle 143
  • Conclusion 165
  • Notes 173
  • Glossary 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 248

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.