Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953

By Yoram Gorlizki; Oleg Khlevniuk | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1
This is described in some detail in V. F. Zima,Golod v SSSR 1946–1947 godov: Proiskhozhdenie i posledstviia (Moscow: IRIRAN, 1996).
2
See [Joseph Stalin], “Komissarov chertova gibel', Istoricheskii arkhiv 5–6 (1997): 218.
3
One, albeit formal, measure of this is that from July 1945 to July 1947, the number of communists in the countryside more than doubled, from 827,000 to 1,896,000. See B. A. Abramov, “Organizatsionno-partiinaia rabota KPSS v gody chetvertoi piatiletki, Voprosyistorii KPSS 3 (1979): 63.
4
The overwhelming majority of the 680,000 people deported to special settlements from 1946 to 1952 were from the newly occupied or reoccupied western regions of Western Ukraine, Belorussia, the Baltic republics, and Moldavia. See Iu. A. Poliakov, ed.,Naselenie Rossii v XX veke, vol. 2 (Moscow: Rosspen, 2001), 171–172. To the extent that there were expulsions of “internal” groups (for example, 3,000 Leningraders in 1949 and 10,000 Mingrelians in 1951), these were relatively limited and targeted in nature.
5
Convictions for counterrevolutionary offenses fell from 129,826 in 1946 to 69,233 in 1948, 53,179 in 1950, and 27,098 in 1952. Figures for the postwar period also reflect a marked decline from prewar levels. Whereas 480,000 people were convicted for “counterrevolutionary crimes” from 1946 to 1952, 1,380,000 had been convicted over an equivalent period from 1930 to 1936, and 1,370,000 were convicted during the Great Terror of 1937–1938. The number of executions also fell sharply. In the postwar period there were 7,700, in comparison to 40,000 from 1930 to 1936 and 680,000 from 1937 to 1938. See GARF f. R-9492 op.6a d.14 l.8; V. P. Popov, “Gosudarstvennyi terror v Sovetskoi Rossii, 1923–1953 gg, Otechestvennye arkhivy 2 (1992): 28; GARF f. R9401 op.1 d.4157 ll.201–205;GULAG. 1918–1960 (Moscow: Materik, 2000), 431–434; and J. Arch Getty and Oleg V. Naumov,The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932–1939 (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1999), 561.

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