Barbarism and Religion: The Enlightenments of Edward Gibbon, 1737-1764 - Vol. 1

By J. G. A. Pocock | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
Gibbon and the rhythm that was different

From Rome– and from excursions to Naples and Venice – Gibbon returned to Hampshire by way of Paris, where he spent a fortnight in the company of both Madame Bontemps and Madame Necker, as Suzanne Curchod had by now become.1 There is little sign that he renewed his explorations of the société des gens de lettres, and he did not visit Paris again until 1777, or Lausanne until 1783. From 1765 begins the middle period of Gibbon's life, during which the Decline and Fall took shape and half of it was written. These eighteen years present many problems to the critic, biographer and historian, not least because we are no longer informed by journals in which Gibbon recorded his doings, readings and reflections; there are only a number of historical essays, not always easy to date,2 what can be learned from his letters, and the Decline and Fall itself. The years from 1765 to 1776, when the first volume of his history appeared, have been dubbed 'Gibbon's dark ages',3 not only because the formation of his project and intentions is ill documented and obscure to us, but because it may – as the Memoirs sometimes indicate – have been obscure to Gibbon himself.4 Some generalisations are, however, permissible. There is a process of self-fashioning, freed of many inhibitions by the death of Edward Gibbon II, in which Gibbon solved his problem of being both gentleman and historian by moving to London, living off the income from leasing his estate, and moving in the circles of the Literary Club and the House of Commons (to which he was elected by a patron in 1774). About this time he jokingly described himself as 'an Englishman, a philosopher, and a Whig',5 as if his identity were settled; but in 1776, with the publication of his first volume, he

____________________
1
Memoirs, p. 137 (A, p. 271); Letters, pp. 199–201; YEG, pp. 227–8; Baridon, I, pp. 122–4.
2
These are to be found, as dated by Lord Sheffield, in MW, III–V; Craddock's English Essays is a critical editionof those in that language. A complete editionof Gibbon's essays in both French and Englishis muchto be desired.
3
Ghosh, 1983.
4
Memoirs, pp. 136–7, 140–2 (A, pp. 275–6), 146–7 (A, pp. 283–5), 155–6 (A, p. 308).
5
Letters, II, p. 6 (11 March 1774).

-292-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Barbarism and Religion: The Enlightenments of Edward Gibbon, 1737-1764 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 339

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.